Jim Blodget's Art

Traditional and digital art

Archives (page 3 of 12)

Backyard Color

Backyard Color
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Every year I try to capture the Fall colors in our backyard. I usually take photos. This year I did a small sketch with brush markers.

Fabriano Hot Press Watercolor paper, pencil, ZIG Brushables and Tombow brush markers. Image is 3.5X10 inches (9X25.4 cm).

Jim

Fruit Trees

Fruit Trees
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Here’s another quick watercolor study done in one go with a single round brush. I drew with the brush working across the page from left to right. The hardest part was keeping it simple with a minimum number of brush strokes. I have a tendency to over work it and make it into a painting instead of leaving it a simple sketch. Simplicity is hard, but I think I managed to capture the shapes, colors, and lighting of the scene without over doing it.

Canson Watercolor Cold Press paper 5.5 x 8.5 inches (13.9 x 21.6 cm), Princeton #8 round brush, and Daniel Smith watercolors.

Jim

Landscape watercolor

Landscape Watercolor
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I’ve been admiring David Hockney’s watercolor sketchbook landscapes. I thought I would try to do something similar. This time I used a medium round water brush and Daniel Smith watercolors on 5.5×8.5 inch Canson watercolor paper. I looked at a black and white reference photo on my computer monitor that I had taken a few years ago near the Gallon House covered bridge near Silverton. These round brush watercolor sketches are fast and easy to do and I like the sparse simplicity.

Jim

Sketching Methods

Sketching Methods
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Sometimes I use a sketch as a visual note to myself. Instead of trying to do a finished drawing on location I will do a quick sketch to capture an idea or impression of what I notice. I may later use the note to do a finished work instead of using a reference photo. Here are three approaches. Each one took me less than 10 minutes to draw. The first one uses line to establish shapes, structure, and proportions. The second is a tone sketch to remember the values, and the third is a color sketch to capture the local colors in the scene.

Jim

Bush Park – 2

Bush Park

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Today I’m practicing my brush technique with another quick sketch of Bush park. I worked from a reference photo I took during a walk in the park. I did this directly with a single brush in one pass. I did the blue sky first into wet paper. I then did the foreground on wet paper with a couple of mixed greens, a dash of blue, and a couple of browns. Next, I brushed in the tree trunks working from left to right across the page. Finally I added the background foliage.

Canson Watercolor Cold Press paper 5.5 x 8.5 inches (13.9 x 21.6 cm), Princeton #8 round brush, and Daniel Smith watercolors.

Jim

Bush Park

Bush Park

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I discovered a sketchbook done by David Hockney of the landscapes of Yorkshire. I admired his simple use of a single round watercolor brush and thought I’d like to try his technique. I did this simple watercolor sketch on cold press paper using a single #8 round brush.

Canson Watercolor Cold Press paper 5.5 x 8.5 inches (13.9 x 21.6 cm), Princeton #8 round brush, and Daniel Smith watercolors.

Jim

Forest

Forest
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I did this sketch on my iPad Pro 9.7 inch using an Apple Pencil. I used two iPads while doing this. I looked at the photo reference on my iPad Mini while drawing on the iPad Pro. Here is the reference photo.

Forest Photo
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I like working this way. I’m not tied to the photo’s composition like I am when I place the photo in a layer under the drawing layer.

Jim

Affinity Photo

Affinity Photo
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I did this in Affinity Photo on my iPad Pro 9.7 inch using an Apple Pencil. I wanted to see if I could emulate the look of Degas’s landscape monotypes done with oil paint on a copper plate. Affinity Photo has a wide variety of excellent brushes. I used one of the Etching brushes, one of the Texture brushes, and one of the Oil brushes and switched back and forth between black and the light cream color I used for the background. Done from imagination.

iPad Pro 9.7 inch and Apple Pencil, Affinity Photo app.

Jim